Champion of Champions title
Finals, Main News, News

Neil Robertson Wins Champion of Champions Title

Neil Robertson has regained the Champion of Champions title after a mesmorising 10-9 victory over Judd Trump in Coventry on Sunday.

Champion of Champions title
Robertson beat defending champion O’Sullivan in the last four. Photo credit: Champion of Champions

The Australian, who last won this event in 2015, conjured up a remarkable finish to a barnstorming affair that had a little bit of everything.

The pair shared eight century breaks between them – a record for a best of 19 frames encounter – with Robertson’s 137 in the last frame suitably deciding the contest.



After playing his part in a gripping affair from start to finish, Trump will be left to rue a missed opportunity in the penultimate frame that would have prolonged his hot streak of late.

The world number one had just snatched a dramatic 17th frame on the black after needing a snooker late in the frame.

But the tables were turned in the 18th frame when Trump, 9-8 in front, broke down on a run of 69.

It was Robertson’s turn to require a snooker to this time keep the showdown alive and the Melbourne man duly obliged before forcing an unbelievable re-spotted black, which he potted to force the final frame.

The snooker gods appeared to be on the 37 year-old’s side by this stage and Robertson fittingly produced his fifth ton of the tie to seal the £150,000 top prize.

An emotional Robertson was welcomed by his son soon after the absorbing affair reached its frenetic climax, before celebrating together with his young family to the grateful applause of a thoroughly entertained audience.

Trump was denied a second trophy in a matter weeks and a sixth piece of silverware this year, but the world champion was magnanimous in defeat.

The Champion of Champions title has become a coveted one to capture ever since its launch on the calendar six years ago.

Following a scrappy opening frame that went Robertson’s way, the pair conjured up a devastating display of power scoring to electrify the Ricoh Arena.

Robertson’s runs of 137, 135, 112, 111, and 104 were countered by a hat-trick from Trump, compiled in succession in the first session when he tallied almost 400 unanswered points.

The latter still trailed 5-4 heading into the evening’s bout of play but the topsy-turvy nature of the battle continued.

It looked as though the Englishman was going to etch his name onto the trophy for the first time only for Robertson’s late recovery to steal the show in what has already been described as one of the greatest finals ever.

Victory represents Robertson’s third of the year, adding to his prior glories in the Welsh and China Opens in the second half of last season.

This time two years ago, the 2010 world champion was suffering a serious slide down the rankings that culminated in his brief plummet outside the world’s top 16 in the rankings.

A player of Robertson’s class was unlikely to be down for long and, although he missed out on qualification for the 2018 Masters, his return to the highest echelons has been rapid.

Trump and Ronnie O’Sullivan have been the best players in the last twelve months, highlighted by the number of high-profile tournaments that they have both managed to win in that spell.

But Robertson, when he hasn’t been pulling out of competitions for travelling mishaps, has been a regular fixture at the business end too and this glory only reasserts his status as one of the game’s very top competitors.

Trump shouldn’t be too disappointed to miss out on the Champion of Champions title and will still head into his defence of this week’s Northern Ireland Open as a confident cueist in the form of his career.

Robertson, though, can revel in a triumph that will live in the memories of fans who were fortunate enough to witness it – especially live.

It was an appropriate way to end the Ricoh Arena’s tenure as the Champion of Champions host, with the tournament set to move to Milton Keynes in 2020.



21 Comments

  1. Pingback: Three Things Learned after the Champion of Champions - SnookerHQ

  2. Pingback: Northern Ireland Open Semi-Final Preview - SnookerHQ

  3. Pingback: Judd Trump Defends Alex Higgins Trophy - SnookerHQ

  4. Pingback: UK Championship Draw and Preview - SnookerHQ

  5. Pingback: Who Will Win the 2019 UK Championship? - SnookerHQ

  6. Pingback: Eight Former Winners in UK Championship Last 32 - SnookerHQ

  7. Pingback: Neil Robertson Wins 2020 European Masters With Whitewash - SnookerHQ

  8. Pingback: Neil Robertson Wins 2020 European Masters With Whitewash - Snooker Freaks

  9. Pingback: German Masters Final: Judd Trump vs Neil Robertson - SnookerHQ

  10. Pingback: Judd Trump Captures German Masters Title - SnookerHQ

  11. Pingback: Recap: The 2019/20 Snooker Season Until Now - SnookerHQ

  12. Pingback: Crucible Seed #2: Neil Robertson's Season - SnookerHQ

  13. Pingback: Crucible Seed #2: Neil Robertson’s Season – Bouncing Bill

  14. Pingback: Jimmy White Confirmed in Champion of Champions - SnookerHQ

  15. Pingback: 2020 English Open Final: Judd Trump vs Neil Robertson - SnookerHQ

  16. Pingback: 2020 English Open Final: Judd Trump vs Neil Robertson – Bouncing Bill

  17. Pingback: Judd Trump Claims English Open Title - SnookerHQ

  18. Pingback: Judd Trump Claims English Open Title – Bouncing Bill

  19. Pingback: Champion of Champions Draw, Preview, and Where to Watch - SnookerHQ

  20. Pingback: Champion of Champions Draw, Preview, and Where to Watch – Bouncing Bill

  21. Pingback: UK Championship Final: Judd Trump vs Neil Robertson - SnookerHQ

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.




World Rankings Top 16

World Rankings after the World Snooker Championship – won by Mark Selby.

1. Judd Trump
2. Mark Selby
3. Ronnie O’Sullivan
4. Neil Robertson
5. Shaun Murphy
6. Kyren Wilson
7. John Higgins
8. Ding Junhui
9. Stephen Maguire
10. Yan Bingtao
11. Mark Williams
12. Mark Allen
13. Barry Hawkins
14. Jack Lisowski
15. Stuart Bingham
16. Anthony McGill

Fin Ruane Snooker Academy